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FAQ's

Kidneys for transplant may come from a person who has died (a deceased donor), or from a healthy living person like a family member or a friend who offers to donate a kidney (a living donor). Contact us.
Many patients assume they are too old for transplant but if you are otherwise healthy, age is not a factor in determining your transplant eligibility. However, there are some other factors that prevent patients from getting a kidney transplant
  • Current life expectancy of less than 5 years
  • Recent cancer (other than most skin cancers)
  • Uncorrectable heart disease
  • Untreatable psychiatric illness
  • Missing dialysis appointments or signing off the machine early
  • Active substance abuse (alcohol or drugs)
  • Lack of health insurance or Medicare/ Medicaid coverage
You and your transplant doctor will discuss your eligibility during the transplant evaluation process. Contact us.
In general, the sooner you get a kidney transplant, the better. The transplant team and your nephrologists will determine the best time for you. Contact us.
No, if the transplant doesn't work, you can:
  • Start or resume dialysis
  • Pursue another transplant
Contact us.
Patients who do not have a living donor can wait to get a deceased donor transplant. Contact us.
Yes. Living donor transplants last longer than deceased donor transplants because a living donor kidney is removed from a healthy donor in the operating room and transplanted right away. Living donor transplants last on average for 15-20 years and deceased donor transplants last for 10-15 years. Some transplants have been known to last much longer. Contact us.
Yes. Patients who have a transplant generally live longer than patients who stay on dialysis. The transplanted kidney works 24 hours a day to remove 50-85% of the total waste your body generates. Dialysis on the other hand only removes 15% of total waste and only when on the dialysis machine. Contact us.
Kidney transplants have a success rate of more than 95 percent. Living donor transplants last for an average of 15-20 years and deceased donor transplants last for 10-15 years. If a transplant fails, a patient can begin or return to dialysis and/ or pursue another transplant. Contact us.